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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
's leadership. then came president obama's election in 2008. health care reform igniting the tea party movement and then demint quickly became a leader and re hetorical flamethrower. >> if we're able to stop obama on this, it will be his waterloo. >> but demint had no significant legislative impact or victories regularly bucking the republican establishment, supporting senate candidates close to his own view of conservatism with, of course, mixed success. >> i've been criticized by some of my republican colleagues for saying i'd rather have 30 republicans in the senate who believe in the principles of freedom than 60 who don't believe in anything. >> he was an early supporter of florida senator marco rubio. now the gop star, incoming senator cruz who tells mike lee all on the demint list. while 15 won primaries just seven are united states senators today. many party leaders, in fact, blame demint for high-profile senate losses in indiana, delaware, colorado and nevada and in a statement made yesterday minority leader mitch mcconnell said this. i thank senator demint for his uncompromising servi
of his re-election and the fact he campaigned the issue at the core of these negotiations, raising rates on high income. this report i don't see as changing the dynamic much at all. it was one of these reports that both side could and did day care from it what they wanted to. even at 146,000, that's not at a level high enough to be bringing back into employment a lot of people that lost their jobs. gwen: there's a public dynamic, which we just say -- saw, the president and speaker. then we hope, we assume, they're a private dynamic going on. what do we know about that? >> if you talk to the speaker of the house and his statue they say there are negotiations going on between the speaker and the president. on thursday the staffs met and hashed some things out. i'm told they're going to continue talks through the weekend now, so there's something going on here behind the scenes. what we don't know but publicly they continue to fire off artillery barrageses. part of it is they can't admit they have a deal until they have one nailed down. what's been fascinating is to watch how quickly the d
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
the fiscal cliff. right after the election wall street dropped 5% when everybody suddenly focused on the fiscal cliff and realized that this was a problem. but since then it's kind of bumped along at this sort of level. i don't think wall street is at all sanguine about the idea that if we went over the fiscal cliff, life would go on as we know it and everything would be fine. >> one of the things that was really interesting to me to bear out that point is ken conrad yesterday who's been so down, i mean, he's leaving the senate. he's done this for seven years. they can't produce deals. and yesterday when i interviewed him, joe, he said i think we're going to make this. i think the boehner offer had significant indicators that something here is going on, and they're going to come together. >> also, kent conrad, a guy -- i've loved him for a long time, deficit hawk. they haven't allowed him to put a budget out for years. he's growing frustrated. i'm sure he's going to be glad to leave. but i was surprised by that as well. you see also, sam stein, republicans are now starting to real
to make a decision who to put in. he made it clear he wasn't running for election when he was up in 2016. there were some rumblings he would leave early. some people do this when they announce they aren't running again. sets up a fantastic scenario for republicans. all the talk around tim scott. he's a congressman, a black republican, very conservative. what would it say that the state that once elected strom thurmond to the senate would potentially have the only black man in the senate and he just so happens is a republican. you would put potentially tim scott in the senate, have him elected to a full term conceivably. lindsey graham up for election in 2014 and a governor's race in south carolina in 2014. so the palmetto state would become ground zero in a year and a half politically setting up ahead of the 2016 presidential cycle. in a sense, this is a great idea. put in a new young star, put him in place, make him as conservative as jim demint. let him go to the heritage foundation and run a think tank, graham gets saved. in a lot of ways people makes a lot of sense. >> ed, you do kno
at that time. the republicans held a lot of the cards. this time it's very different. president came off the re-election. that's why you see the president holding the hard line. a lot of pressure on the president to hold his hard line even from his left. i think you'll continue to seat president do so. it's going to be up to the republicans to feel whether he has enough pressure, i think the white house is encouraged that some republicans have broken ranks and are starting to say let's look at other opportunities to maybe raise rates. >> we'll talk about the ultimate in breaking ranks if you will. molly, i want to ask you about the surprising resignation of tea party favorite jim demint. it seems kind of sudden. why now? >> everybody was surprised about this. but i seems in the aftermath of the election the republicans are still in the minority of the senate. demint was in the minority of the minority. that's not a very powerful place to be. demint always known as a bomb thrower, someone who liked to make trouble. he figured he's probably correct about this he could have more power and influence and be
type of constitution in which the people can have a say in electing their government. and where the countries then are put on a more stable footing. because once that goes, then what? so this is fantastically difficult. once you lift the lid off these very repressive regimes and out comes all this religious and tribal tension, we have to find a way to stabilizing the situation and bring the bloodshed to an end. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding t
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)